ICSI is best for male infertility

ICSI works best when used for male infertility

Over 2 decades ago, ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) revolutionized the treatment of male infertility. The ICSI procedure involves injection of a single sperm into each egg at the time of IVF (in vitro fertlization). Before the development of ICSI, couples with sperm issues, what we call “male factor,” had very low fertilization and pregnancy rates, even when undergoing IVF. Now a days, because of the use of ICSI, poor sperm quality is a very unusual reason for an IVF cycle to be unsuccessful or to blame for poor fertilization. Over concerns about potentially poor fertilization, many fertility centers have chosen to use ICSI routinely to ensure optimal fertilization even when the male partner’s sperm is perfectly normal. At Princeton IVF, our philosophy has always been to allow fertilization to happen “naturally” in the dish when there is no history of sperm issues or poor fertilization. While ICSI had been shown to be quite safe, we feel that a more natural selection process makes more sense and research in the past has suggested that ICSI is only beneficial in male factor patients. A recent large-scale study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has borne this out. ICSI  when used in IVF cycles used in couples without sperm issues had lower fertilization and lower implantation rates than non ICSI cycles.

Robosperm

Researchers in Germany used very tiny tubes called nanotubes to control the motion of sperm. They used sperm mainly because the sperm are able to propel themselves. Today there is no real application for this even though this is fascinating. In the future, however this could represent a way to help fertilize eggs or even deliver drugs such as chemotherapy to their target. Here’s the video:

5 million IVF Babies Born

ImageSince its start on the fringes of medicine, In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) has resulted in an estimated 5 million births worldwide as announced at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and International Federation of Fertility Societies this week.  The biggest reason for the sudden explosion in IVF babies increased demand in developing countries such as China who now have access to modern medical care including fertility treatment.  There are now more children born through IVF than the population of some countries. That’s pretty remarkable for something that 35 years ago was not readily accepted by society. Click here for more from the article in USA Today.