Should we be teaching about fertility in schools?

cervixOne Australian Fertility Specialist says yes, the classroom is the perfect place to learn about this, as reported on Yahoo News 7. Surveys continually show that the public, both women and men understand very little about their own fertility, and this is perpetuated in the media by stories of miracle late life pregnancies. Many women understand very little about how their own reproductive systems work, and even less about the true effect of age and lifestyle choices on their ability to have a family. Most of us reproductive specialists see patients all the time whose infertility could have been prevented. This doctor in Adelaide sees education as a sort of preventative medicine for infertility and  is advocating making fertility education a part of the school curriculum in his country, along side with  contraception. Will it work? And could it happen here in the US?

IVF babies grow up to be healthy adults

Princeton-IVF-babyFor most couples going who use assisted reproduction, one of the foremost concerns they have is about the health of the children they will hopefully deliver. While there are some concerns about the risks of birth defects and other complications of pregnancy in IVF babies, little was known about how these children do long term. Now, there is some promising long term data coming from Melbourne, Australia that suggests IVF kids do just fine as they grow into adulthood, with generally similar quality of life, health and educational  achievement to normal conceived children.